Using Multiplication To Solve Division Problems

Using Multiplication To Solve Division Problems-5
In fact, the decimal point moves to the right by the same number of zeros in the power of ten multiplier.In cases like this, you can use powers of 10 to help create an easier problem to solve.As with whole numbers, sometimes you run into situations where you need to multiply or divide decimals.

In this case, you can multiply the The number that is being divided into the dividend in a division problem. divisor, 0.3, by 10 to move the decimal point 1 place to the right.

If you multiply the divisor by 10, then you also have to multiply the The number to be divided up in a division problem. To divide by a decimal, multiply the divisor by a power of ten to make the divisor a whole number.

Learning to multiply and divide with decimals is an important skill.

In both cases, you work with the decimals as you have worked with whole numbers, but you have to figure out where the decimal point goes.

For instance, 4.12 Multiplication and division are inverse operations, so you can expect that if you divide a decimal by a power of ten, the decimal point in the quotient will also correspond to the number of zeros in the power of ten.

The difference is that the decimal point moves to the right when you multiply; it moves to the left when you divide.You change the divisor to a whole number, then move the decimal point in the dividend the same number of places and divide.Recall that when you multiply a decimal by a power of ten (10, 100, 1,000, etc), the placement of the decimal point in the product will move to the right according to the number of zeros in the power of ten.Sometimes when you are dividing, the number doesn't go equally and there is something left over called a remainder.After today's lesson, you will know what to do when you have a division problem that ends up with a remainder.Then multiply the dividend by the same power of ten.You can think of this as moving the decimal point in the dividend the same number of places to the right as you move the decimal point in the divisor. Remember that when you divide, you do not count the total number of decimal places in the divisor and dividend.Imagine that a couple eats dinner at a Japanese steakhouse.The bill for the meal is .32—which includes a tax of .64. So if they know how to multiply .64 by 2, the couple can figure out how much they should leave for the tip. Andy just sold his van that averaged 20 miles per gallon of gasoline.It's like the brother of multiplication, so you can use what you already know in multiplication to help you solve division problems.For example, 3 x 2 = 6, so if you take 6 and divide it by 2, it will be 3. (Remember, a fact family is a group of related facts.) This picture helps to show you how division and multiplication are related.

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